Monthly Archives: December 2014

25 Books for 2015

My reading list has been growing at an alarming exciting rate lately, so I thought I would share with you some of the books I will definitely be taking out of the library in 2015.

With a total of 25 books on the list, I will need to read just 2 each month (plus an extra one month) to finish them all in one year.

While there are many, many more than 25 books on my regular reading list, I have organized this 2015 must-read list into 5 categories to ensure variety:

  • Classics I’ve Missed: These are famous works by well-known authors that I somehow haven’t gotten around to reading yet.
  • Authors I Need More Of: These are more obscure or more recent works by authors I have read and loved in the past.
  • Contemporary Women: These are contemporary novels by women authors I haven’t read in the past.
  • Essential Nonfiction: These are books I hope will help me be a better human. All of them cover important and relevant topics that I should be thinking more about.
  • Stranger Than Fiction: These are nonfiction stories that will reveal more about this strange and wonderful world we’re living in.

All sections are arranged alphabetically by author.


CLASSICS I’VE MISSED

baron in the trees - calvinoleft hand of darkness - le guinagainst interpretation - sontaginfinite jestorlando - woolf






  1. Italo Calvino: The Baron in the Trees

    I studied Italian in college, spent a total of 8 months in Italy, and have still managed to never read anything by Italo Calvino (other than If on a winter’s night a traveler in high school – when I was not yet ready to appreciate it – and a few pages of Invisible Cities). Clearly, this needs to change.

  2. Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    I used to read a lot of science fiction, but while I conquered many of the greats of the genre (Asimov, Adams, Bradbury, Herbert, L’Engle, etc, etc), I somehow missed reading anything by Ursula K. Le Guin. The Left Hand of Darkness is one of her most iconic novels, so I figured it was as good a place to start as any.

  3. Susan Sontag: Against Interpretation

    I have read bits and pieces of this thought-provoking essay collection over the years, and now I would like to finally read the rest.

  4. David Foster Wallace: Infinite Jest

    I spent most of the summer of ‘10 trying to check Infinite Jest out of the Washington University library, entirely without success. Hopefully I will have better luck at the St. Louis Central Library in 2015.

  5. Virginia Woolf: Orlando

    I know, I know. I’ve never read Virginia Woolf, and it’s getting to be embarrassing.


AUTHORS I NEED MORE OF

edible woman - atwoodadverbs - handlerthe strange library - murakamiwhite is for witching - oyeyemithe goldfinch - tartt






  1. Margaret Atwood: The Edible Woman

    Ever since I read The Handmaid’s Tale in middle school, I’ve been a big fan of Atwood. I’ve made it through the major works in her canon, but I’m still far from a completist. Tackling her first novel will bring me one step closer.

  2. Daniel Handler: Adverbs

    One of my favorite library moments is when I found out that Roald Dahl, a favorite author of my childhood, also wrote books and short stories for adults. So, when I recently stumbled upon the fact that Daniel Handler (alias Lemony Snicket) had written a novel composed of interlinked short stories for adults, I was thrilled.

  3. Haruki Murakami: The Strange Library

    Haruki Murakami is one of my favorite authors of all time, and I’ve read as many of his novels as I could get my hands on. When NPR informed me that his illustrated novella The Strange Library had just been released in English, I couldn’t wait to add it to my reading list.

  4. Helen Oyeyemi: White Is for Witching

    I discovered the magic that is Helen Oyeyemi in 2014 with Boy, Snow, Bird and Mr. Fox, and I hope to continue it in 2015 with White Is for Witching. Hopefully I’ll have time for The Icarus Girl and The Opposite House too!

  5. Donna Tartt: The Goldfinch

    I read The Secret History and enjoyed it, so when The Goldfinch was everywhere in 2014, I knew it would eventually end up on my list.


CONTEMPORARY WOMEN

americanah - adichiesadness of lemon cake - benderalice + freda - coesilver sparrow - jonesend of mr y - thomas






I’ll let the books in this category – and the following categories – speak for themselves. Since the authors and topics are new to me, I don’t have specific reasons for choosing each book other than the fact that all of them come well reviewed and highly recommended.

  1. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Americanah
  2. Aimee Bender: The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake
  3. Alexis Coe: Alice + Freda Forever
  4. Tayari Jones: Silver Sparrow
  5. Scarlett Thomas: The End of Mr. Y

ESSENTIAL NONFICTION

power of habit - duhigglive alone and like it.inddprivacy - keizerfilter bubble - pariserTarvis_Comp2.indd






  1. Charles Duhigg: The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  2. Marjorie Hillis: Live Alone and Like It: The Classic Guide for the Single Woman
  3. Garrett Keizer: Privacy
  4. Eli Pariser: The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You
  5. Carol Tavris & Elliot Aronson: Mistakes Were Made (But Not By Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts

STRANGER THAN FICTION

penguin book of witches - howehistory of wonder woman - leporesisters - lovelllast call - okrentgod'll cut you down - safran






  1. Katherine Howe: The Penguin Book of Witches
  2. Jill Lepore: The Secret History of Wonder Woman
  3. Mary S. Lovell: The Sisters: The Saga of the Mitford Family
  4. Daniel Okrent: Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition
  5. John Safran: God’ll Cut You Down: The Tangled Tale of a White Supremacist, a Black Hustler, a Murder, and How I Lost a Year in Mississippi

What’s on your list this year? Let me know in the comments what you’re most looking forward to reading in 2015.

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